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    Seizures of All Types

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    krathyn
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    Re: Seizures of All Types

    Post by krathyn on Sun Jan 02, 2011 8:50 pm

    tables for generalized and partial seizures
    TypeDurationSeizure SymptomsPostictal (post-seizure) Symptoms
    Absence (petit mal seizure)2 to 15 secondsStare
    Eyes fluttering
    Automatisms (such as lip smacking, picking at clothes, fumbling) if prolonged
    Amnesia for seizure events
    No confusion
    Promptly resumes activity
    Generalized Tonic-Clonic (grand mal)1 to 2 minutesA cry
    Fall
    Tonicity (rigidity)
    Clonicity (jerking)
    May have cyanosis
    Amnesia for seizure events
    Confusion
    Deep sleep

    [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] (grand mal seizures) are the most common and best known
    TypeDurationSeizure SymptomsPostictal (post-seizure) Symptoms
    Simple Partial90 secondsNo loss of consciousness.
    Sudden jerking
    sensory phenomena
    Possible transient weakness or loss of sensation
    Complex partial1 to 2 minutesMay have aura
    Automatisms (such as lip smacking, picking at clothes, fumbling)
    Unaware of environment
    May wander
    Amnesia for seizure events
    Mild to moderate confusion
    sleepy
    Key Things to Remember about Partial
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    Re: Seizures of All Types

    Post by krathyn on Sun Jan 02, 2011 8:48 pm

    grand mal seizures) are the most common and best known type of generalized seizure. They begin with stiffening of the limbs (the tonic phase), followed by jerking of the limbs and face (the clonic phase).
    Myoclonic seizures are rapid, brief contractions of bodily muscles, which usually occur at the same time on both sides of the body. Occasionally, they involve one arm or a foot. People usually think of them as sudden jerks or clumsiness. A variant of the experience, common to many people who do not have epilepsy, is the sudden jerk of a foot during sleep. First aid is usually not needed, however, a person having a myoclonic seizure for the first time should receive a thorough medical evaluation.
    Atonic seizures produce an abrupt loss of muscle tone. Other names for this type of seizure include drop attacks, astatic or akinetic seizures. They produce head drops, loss of posture, or sudden collapse. Because they are so abrupt, without any warning, and because the people who experience them fall with force, atonic seizures can result in injuries to the head and face. Protective headgear is sometimes used by children and adults; the seizures tend to be resistant to drug therapy. No first aid is needed (unless there is injury from the fall), but if this is a first atonic seizure, the child should be given a thorough medical evaluation.
    [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] (also called petit mal seizures) are lapses of awareness, sometimes with staring, that begin and end abruptly, lasting only a few seconds. There is no warning and no after-effect. More common in children than in adults, absence seizures are frequently so brief that they escape detection, even if the child is experiencing 50 to 100 attacks daily. They may occur for several months before a child is sent for a medical evaluation.
    Infantile Spasms are clusters of quick, sudden movements that start between 3 months and two years. If a child is sitting up, the head will fall forward, and the arms will flex forward. If lying down, the knees will be drawn up, with arms and head flexed forward as if the baby is reaching for support. What to Do: No first aid, but doctor should be consulted.
    Partial Seizures


    In partial seizures the electrical disturbance is limited to a specific area of one cerebral hemisphere (side of the brain). Partial seizures are subdivided into [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] (in which consciousness is retained); and [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] (in which consciousness is impaired or lost). Partial seizures may spread to cause a generalized seizure, in which case the classification category is partial seizures secondarily generalized.
    Partial seizures are the most common type of seizure experienced by people with epilepsy. Virtually any movement, sensory, or emotional symptom can occur as part of a partial seizure, including complex visual or auditory hallucinations.
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    Seizures of All Types

    Post by krathyn on Sun Jan 02, 2011 8:43 pm

    Types of Seizures


    There are many different types of seizures. People may experience just one type or more than one. The kind of seizure a person has depends on which part and how much of the brain is affected by the electrical disturbance that produces seizures. Experts divide seizures into generalized seizures (absence, atonic, tonic-clonic, myoclonic), partial (simple and complex) seizures, nonepileptic seizures and status epilepticus.
    Generalized Seizures


    Generalized seizures affect both cerebral hemispheres (sides of the brain) from the beginning of the seizure. They produce loss of consciousness, either briefly or for a longer period of time, and are sub-categorized into several major types: generalized tonic clonic; myoclonic; absence; and atonic.
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